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9 Sculptures in Singapore by Local Artists

Culture & Heritage

Published on 24 Jul 2018

by WorldRoamer® Travel Team

9 Sculptures in Singapore by Local Artists

Culture & Heritage

Published on 24 Jul 2018

by WorldRoamer® Travel Team

Do you like to admire art? Go on a stroll and admire these 9 sculptures done by local talents in Singapore that add history and beauty to the streets.

We present you with 9 sculptures scattered over the island that reflect the country’s history, its present artists, and an insight into the city’s future.

1. “Mother and Child” (1980) by Ng Eng Teng

The Grandfather of Singapore Sculpture, Ng Eng Teng (1934-2001), produced three pieces of Mother and Child which reflect the tender love he experienced from his mother. This sculpture, located at Tampines Central Park, depicts a caring mother carrying a cheerful and secure baby. One of Dr Ng’s Mother and Child sculptures was originally located outside Far East Shopping Centre in 1980, but has since moved to Orchard Parade Hotel. It was one of the iconic installations at Orchard Road in the eighties.

In front of Orchard Parade Hotel
Address: 1 Tanglin Road, Singapore 247905

“Mother and Child” (1980) by Ng Eng Teng Article Photo WR 1 Resized Source: WorldRoamer®

2. “First Generation” (2000) by Chong Fah Cheong

The water channels of Fullerton functioned more than a merchant and trade port – it was where the children played and grew up. Here, Chong Fah Cheong depicts this joyful innocence in these five sculptures.

In front of Fullerton Hotel
Address: 1 Fullerton Square, Singapore 049178

“First Generation” (2000) by Chong Fah Cheong Article Photo WR 2 Resized Source: WorldRoamer®

3. “Fishing at Singapore River” (2004) by Chern Lian Shan

Taiwan-born sculptor Chern settled in Singapore from 1980. Here, he depicts a typical day in early Singapore, where it was common for the locals to fish by the Singapore River and where people lived simple and full lives.

In front of The Riverwalk
Address: 20 Upper Circular Road, Singapore 058416

“Fishing at Singapore River” (2004) by Chern Lian Shan Article Photo WR 3 Resized Source: WorldRoamer®

4. “The River Merchants” (2002) by Aw Tee Hong

These sculptures form a set, where one of Singapore's earliest merchants, Alexander Laurie Johnston, is seated in conversation with a Chinese trader and a Malay chief, as labourers load goods onto a bullock cart. It is located in front of Maybank Tower, where Alexander Laurie Johnston & Co's warehouse once stood.

In front of Maybank Tower
Address: 2 Battery Road, Maybank Tower, Singapore 049907

“The River Merchants” (2002) by Aw Tee Hong Article Photo WR 4 Resized Source: WorldRoamer®

5. “From Chettiars to Financiers” (2002) by Chern Lian Shan

Interestingly, this set of sculptures represents the beginnings of Singapore’s early financial services to present-day bankers. One can hope that their garments easily give the plot away!

Chettiers from South India had run majority of the moneylending services, with Chinese clerks in charge of most of the clearing houses then. Fast forward to today’s modern banking environment, represented by a female trader either gesturing hello…or making a trade.

By the Asian Civilisations Museum
Address: 1 Empress Place, Singapore 179555

“From Chettiars to Financiers” (2002) by Chern Lian Shan Article Photo WR 5 Resized Source: WorldRoamer®

6. “A Great Emporium” (2001) by Malcolm Koh

Here, Koh showcases a scene of his experience from memory – an everyday scene along the Singapore River where a group of traders are negotiating the price of a sack of cinnamon.

By the Asian Civilisations Museum
Address: 1 Empress Place, Singapore 179555

A Great Emporium” (2001) by Malcolm Koh Article Photo WR 6 Resized Source: WorldRoamer®

7. “Happy Family of Five” (2012) by Chua Boon Kee

The Happy Family of Five symbolises The Esplanade’s Forecourt Garden as a joyous place for families and friends to gather and enjoy the city. It was commissioned in 2012 in conjunction with The Esplanade’s 10th Anniversary celebrations.

Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay
Address: 1 Esplanade Drive, Singapore 038981

“Happy Family of Five” (2012) by Chua Boon Kee Article Photo WR 7 Resized Source: WorldRoamer®

8. “Chinese Procession” (2001) by Lim Leong Seng

In the 19th Century, Telok Ayer was an ethnic district of Chinese immigrants. Here, Lim depicts a Chinese family participating in a lively street festival and procession for the Mid-Autumn Festival, where they are carrying lanterns and flags as part of the festive cheer.

Telok Ayer Green
Address: Boon Tat Street, Singapore 069620

“Chinese Procession” (2001) by Lim Leong Seng Article Photo WR 8 Resized Source: WorldRoamer®

9. “Indian Settlers” (2001) by Lim Leong Seng

Lim Leong Seng portrays Singapore’s multiculturalism here, depicting how Telok Ayer was not only an ethnic district of Chinese immigrants, but also of Indian immigrants. Here, they’re in trade negotiations. Evidently, bargaining isn’t a lost artform.

Telok Ayer Green
Address: Boon Tat Street, Singapore 069620

“Indian Settlers” (2001) by Lim Leong Seng Article Photo WR 9 Resized Source: WorldRoamer®

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